Loomio
Wed 14 Oct 2015

Submission 4: TrendsOnline

SR
Shadrock Roberts Public Seen by 259

We know our community’s vitality, opportunity and sustainability depends on informed decision-making and collective action. That’s why TrendsOnline will become a vital resource helping Boulder adapt and grow by identifying chronic stresses, such as lack of affordable housing, achievement gap in schools and economic inequality. TrendsOnline will make visible these most pressing needs and connect people with organizations that are taking action.

TrendsOnline aligns with the UR Boulder goal of strengthening citizen engagement through open-source technology and supports the theme of Capacity and Preparedness. We also see a clear fit within the City Resilience Framework (www.100resilientcities.org), in which the theme of Empower a Broad Range of Stakeholders states: “Ensure everybody is well informed, capable, and involved in their city. This includes ... timely and appropriate monitoring.” TrendsOnline will be a highly-valued resource for nonprofits and government, as organizations seek to understand and address chronic stresses.

For 20 years, the Trends Report has been a valuable resource to nonprofits, government, business and residents. The new online version will complement the biennial publication. We’ll know this product works by meeting these objectives:
- Increase number and diversity of people reached
- Easier access to community indicators
- Simple, attractive presentation of data and analysis
- Easy to understand, search, navigate
- Deliver updated and relevant data
- People can easily connect with organizations

We’ll measure how people are using the product through web analytics; number/type of connections to other resources; citations from sources; and user interviews/surveys. In terms of impact, we’ll monitor how TrendsOnline information is referenced and shared in the community, compared to exposures with the print-only version.

Our research finds that nationwide, nearly all community indicators reports are publications. By creating open source technology that is designed for reuse we’ll benefit communities well beyond Boulder County.

SR

Shadrock Roberts started a proposal Wed 14 Oct 2015

Will this idea improve resilience in Boulder or strengthen citizen engagement? Closed Sat 17 Oct 2015

Results
Agree - 13
Abstain - 13
Disagree - 13
Block - 13
15 people have voted (33%)
VA

Violet Alexandre
Abstain
Wed 14 Oct 2015

ES

Erika Stutzman
Agree
Wed 14 Oct 2015

Trends is a valued resource in the community, but as a biennial publication putting it online an dynamic will reach many more people in our community. It encourages civic engagement and sustainability in our community.

RH

Robyn Hazlitt
Agree
Wed 14 Oct 2015

TRENDS Online will absolutely improve Boulder's resilience and strengthen citizen engagement within the county. People are able to see actual data showing the areas needing drastic improvement, and that change is possible based on past successes.

AT

Aaron Titus
Abstain
Wed 14 Oct 2015

I am unfamiliar with Trends Report; though I would highly suggest coordinating with 2-1-1s, which have very good community trend data
Would the open source solution be federated or re-brandable by other organizations?

MV

Maegan Vallejo
Agree
Wed 14 Oct 2015

The ways that people access information continues to change. Trends in its print form may not be reaching as many people as it could. The more people know about their community, the better they can proactively engage with it.

JZ

Jennifer Zawacki Thu 15 Oct 2015

This sounds great! I'm curious to know more about the existing Trends Report (how is data collected, processed, and presented?). For a broadly-accessed online version, I'd love to see a lot of diverse user testing to ensure accessibility.

JZ

Jennifer Zawacki
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

LC

Le Chang
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

It will definitely improve the resilience in Boulder and enhance engagement. If people know more about the city indicator figures and have more access to the information, people tend to discuss more, which will lead to collective actions.

GM

Geri Mitchell-Brown Thu 15 Oct 2015

@jenniferzawacki +1 about diverse user testing, definitely on our radar. Calling in @erikastutzman to answer your Trends Report questions.

ES

Erika Stutzman Thu 15 Oct 2015

@jenniferzawacki "Re: more about the existing Trends Report (how is data collected, processed, and presented?):" It's a 20-year indicators project with data on more than 150 measures of the quality of life. Print version here: http://www.commfound.org/trendsmagazine
We publish 8K, put it online as published, then present it in person to civic groups, policy leaders, and nonprofit leaders. To bring it into its future, we would be delighted to make it robust, constantly updated and accessible for all.

GM

Geri Mitchell-Brown
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

TrendsOnline will improve resilience by shining light on chronic stresses (e.g. lack of affordable housing, school achievement gap, economic inequality) AND strengthen engagement by connecting people with organizations taking action on these issues

SR

Shadrock Roberts Thu 15 Oct 2015

It appreciate the thought that's gone into hitting a few of the key themes (information sharing and monitoring) but I would disagree that publishing data automatically leads to improved resilience or engagement. There's clearly been some thinking about measuring impact, which would help answer this question over time. I also think having either a dedicated user or a concrete use case that shows how the data would could lead to the changes suggested would strengthen this idea.

SR

Shadrock Roberts
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

DA

Dee Andrews
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

Trends is the go-to report to best understand current challenges and opportunities to improve life in Boulder County. Having it online is essential as technology grows and the ways people access information continues to change.

MK

Margaret Katz
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

JH

Josie Heath
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

SR

Stefan Reyes
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

SR

Stefan Reyes
Agree
Thu 15 Oct 2015

GM

Geri Mitchell-Brown Fri 16 Oct 2015

@shadrockroberts I'm sharing this response from Erika Stutzman, who is traveling today. From @erikastutzman "At a political debate Weds night, the moderator (not affiliated with Community Foundation) used data contained in Trends report to ask the candidates a question about how to address the problem of growing inequality in Boulder County. That shows that the data can be used in a relevant way, but the moderator happened to attend an in-person Trends presentation. We have 8,000 copies and one staff member who does all of the presentations in person. That's not a 2015 way of spreading information."

GM

Geri Mitchell-Brown Fri 16 Oct 2015

@shadrockroberts Sharing more from @erikastutzman – an example of use of data to improve engagement, leading to increased resilience from chronic stressors: "The achievement gap data sparked the school readiness initiative. A program born from that data that works directly with Latino families in our communities to get their children ready for school. We used the data to raise funds for the program, and the families use the data literally going door to door talking about the importance of early childhood education and reading to children, etc. They hold house parties where they talk about the achievement gap and how to bridge it. But we're limited in size and scope to using the data for our own leadership programs and sharing it with our partners. Unleashing the data to the way people actually access information today means there could be several entrepreneurial or startup ideas by groups of people who aren't our current partners."

PC

Pam Clark
Agree
Fri 16 Oct 2015

SR

Shadrock Roberts Fri 16 Oct 2015

@gerimb that's great to hear! I would suggest that if you have a confirmed user or use case that you include that in your pitch. I've seen lots of very good open data go unused because there was no, confirmed, user or use case. This is just my opinion, however: I'm not on the final jury! So just sharing my observations here.

GM

Geri Mitchell-Brown Sat 17 Oct 2015

@shadrockroberts We are fortunate to have a known user base for the Trends publication. Primary users include: nonprofit organizations (usually development staff using the data for grant applications), civic groups/leaders, journalists, local policymakers, city planners, and faith organization members. These users already rely on Trends data to support their own work in the community. People will migrate to TrendsOnline instead of reading through the publication or reaching out through email or phone, as they do today. In addition, an important success factor is that TrendsOnline increase the number and diversity of people that are currently being reached, example personas we have in this category are "young startup worker" and "Max's mom".

MB

Melissa Bica
Agree
Sun 18 Oct 2015