Loomio
Sun 15 Mar 2015

DemocracyOS / Why Y Combinator funded a radical politcal party in argentina

DU

[deactivated account] Sun 15 Mar 2015

Isn't that basically what the pirate parties do anyway ?
Crowd source policy and go with public opinion.

However, the notion of an app for political action is something
That I have been working on for a few years now.
However loomio is not the place to discuss this :-)

BV

Ben Vidulich Sun 15 Mar 2015

Isn’t that basically what the pirate parties do anyway ?
Crowd source policy and go with public opinion.

I suppose so. (Although personally I see that as a recipe for inaction)

However, the notion of an app for political action is something
That I have been working on for a few years now.

Have any more details about it (elsewhere if that's more suitable...)?

DP

David Peterson Sun 15 Mar 2015

Discussions on Hacker News (which is part of Y Combinator):
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9194889
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8058496

AR

Andrew Reitemeyer Sun 15 Mar 2015

We have multiple projects from Pirates including:
PPIS Wasa2il
PPBE created software that Podomo in Spain is using
Rick Falkvinge is working on the Swarmops suite
Working together is not something Pirates do especially well but the multiplicity of projects is not a bad thing as there is no one key fits all doors.

DS

Danyl Strype Tue 12 May 2015

From a quick look at the demo, so far it looks like simplified version of what Loomio has already developed. At the moment, particularly because of the publicity around the WikiLeaks and Snowden revelations, we are seeing an explosion of software and platform projects addressing the needs of secure horizontal organising, and large-scale participatory decision-making. Over time, many of these projects will stall, and sustainable developer and user communities will gather around others.

I saw a similar dynamic with Indymedia CMS software back in the late 90s/ early 2000s. A range of projects emerged, each started by a group scratching their own itch, often because existing projects weren't using their preferred language and they wanted to add features. Each Indymedia site would choose which codebase to use.

Eventually, as mass-use CMS projects like Drupal and Wordpress started to emerge, techs started to build Indymedia-specific distributions on top of those. Again, some Indymedia sites switched to those, while others stayed with one or two of the custom codebases which were still being maintained.

IMHO The important things non-programmers can contribute to the evolution of new wave of online group software are:
* write publicly about our needs and values: exactly what do we want from our software, what clusters of functions do we want in each package we want to use, what freedoms do we want software to respect etc
* test every piece of useful-looking software we have time to test, and publicly report our results, with respect for the fact that any piece of software is a work in progress, and respect for the (often voluntary) work of developers
* encourage the use or creation of common protocols etc
* * facilitate alliances and cooperation between all the projects, and all the developers working in this space

AR

Andrew Reitemeyer Wed 13 May 2015

We have quite a few talented people in the movement but most want to see their own particular projects succeed and we end up with lots of projects that do not reach fruition. This is more because they do not know what each other is doing than anything else - a failure of PPI. The only projects that have come to the point where they are being tested are from PPIS and PPBE.

DS

Danyl Strype Tue 23 Jun 2015

Groupware is not the only area on which proliferation of projects leads to lots of dead projects, and slowed progress on the surviving ones. Check out this graphic which visualises the history of free code projects aspiring to produce video-editing software.